Saturday, May 13, 2017

Learning Latin with Pope Francis - May 13, 2017 #2

To visit my archive of Latin Papal Tweets, go to my main page. 

May 13, 2017 #2



Here's a literal translation of the Latin: Fatima is primarily a mantle of Light, which covers us, when we take refuge under the protection of the Virgin Mother, imploring: Show Jesus to us.

NB: Viriginis is an unfortunate typo. It should be Virginis.

And here's how the grammar of this Latin tweet works:


Latin
English
Parsing
Grammar Points
Fatima
Fatima
nom. sing. fem. place name
Fatima, Fatimae
imprimis
primarily
adv.
est
is
3rd pers. sing. pres. ind. verb
sum, esse, fui
pallium
a mantle
nom. sing. neut. noun
pallium, palliī
Lucis
of Light
gen. sing. fem. noun
lūx, lūcis
quod
which
nom. sing. neut. rel. pronoun
qui, quae, quod
nos
us
acc. pl. pronoun
nos, nostri
operit
covers
3rd pers. sing. pres. act. ind. verb
operiō, operīre, operuī, opertus
cum
when
conj.
sub
under
Prep. + Acc.
Virginis
of the Virgin
gen. sing. fem. noun
Virgo, Virginis
Matris
mother
gen. sing. fem. noun
mater, matris
praesidium
protection
acc. sing. neut. noun
praesidium, praesidii
confugimus
we take refuge
1st pers. pl. pres. act. ind. veb
cōnfugiō, cōnfugere, cōnfūgī
exposcentes
imploring
nom. pl. pres. act. part.
expōscō, expōscere, expopōscī
Iesum
Jesus
acc. sing. name
Iesus, Iesu
nobis
to us
dat. pl. pronoun
nos, nostri
ostende
show
sing. imper.
ostendō, ostendere, ostendī, ostentus

Learning Latin with Pope Francis - May 8, 2017

To visit my archive of Latin Papal Tweets, go to my main page. 

May 8, 2017



Here's a literal translation of the Latin: May Jesus, who conquered the darkness of sin and death, give peace to our days.

And here's how the grammar of this Latin tweet works:


Latin
English
Parsing
Grammar Points
Iesus
Jesus
nom. sing. masc. name
Iesus, Iesu
qui
who
nom. sing. masc. rel. pronoun
qui, quae, quod
vicit
conquered
3rd pers. perf. act. ind. verb
vincō, vincere, vīcī, vīctus
tenebras
darkness
acc. pl. fem. noun
tenebra, tenebrae (usually plural)
peccati
of sin
gen. sing. neut. noun
peccatum, peccati
et
and
conj.
mortis
of death
gen. sing. fem. noun
mors, mortis
det
may he give
3rd pers. pres. act. subj. verb
dō, dare, dedī, datus
nostris
to our
dat. pl. com. poss. adj.
noster, nostra, nostrum
diebus
days
dat. pl. com. noun
diēs, dieī
pacem
peace
acc. sing. fem. noun
pax. pacis

Learning Latin with Pope Francis - May 13, 2017 #1

To visit my archive of Latin Papal Tweets, go to my main page. 

May 13 2017 #1



Here's a literal translation of the Latin: Whenever we catch sight of Mary, we believe again in the renewing power of sweetness and fondness.

And here's how the grammar of this Latin tweet works:


Latin
English
Parsing
Grammar Points
Quandoque
Whenever
adv.
conspicimus
we catch sight of
1st pers. pl. pres. act. ind. verb
cōnspiciō, cōnspicere, cōnspēxī, cōnspectus
Mariam
Mary
acc. sing. fem. name
Maria, Mariae
potentiae
the power
dat. sing. fem. noun
potentia, potentiae
renovanti
renewing
dat. sing. pres. act. part.
renovō, renovāre, renovāvī, renovātus
suavitatis
of sweetness
gen. sing. fem. noun
suāvitās, suāvitātis
et
and
conj.
affectus
of fondness
gen. sing. masc. noun
affectus, affectūs
rursum
again
adv.
credimus
we believe in
1st pers. pl. pres. act. ind. verb
crēdō, crēdere, crēdidī, crēditus

Sunday, April 23, 2017

How Would You Say "Why Bother?" in Latin?

I am always happy to take requests, and this one comes from a student at NYU, referred to me by one of my former students, one of the best I ever taught.

And so, how would you say "Why Bother?" in Latin?

Well, before we can translate this, we have to determine--what exactly is the English even saying?

I mean, is this short for "Why should you bother?" Is it short for "Why should I bother?"

These things really matter in translation!

I think, and tell me if you disagree, that it's basically neutral. This statement is essentially saying "Why to bother?"

As such, I think we can express this accurately just using the infinitive "to bother."

But how the hell do you say that in Latin?

I searched a lot of resources and found that the closest match for this concept is the idiom "to move oneself (to action)." This is what John Traupman thinks is closest, and that's good enough for me.

Now it becomes a question of what word order would be most authentic coming from the mouth of that murderous psychopath Julius Caesar (who was, among his many "qualities" a native speaker of Latin).

Why to move yourself? (id est [i.e.] Why Bother?

For as fond as I am of how Spanish pastes objects onto infinitives (exempli gratia [e.g.] Quiero verte [I want to see you]), Latin tended to place the object before the infinitive. Even today in Spanish, Te quiero ver is grammatical. 

Ergo, my suggestion for how to say, in Latin, "Why Bother?" is:

Cur te movēre?

That's my rather educated guess, but don't tattoo it onto your body just because I said so...


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